The Central MA Regional Public Health Alliance routinely collects data on a wide variety of health conditions and health habits among residents to inform program planning and policy development. Key data are available below by Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP) topic area. For more information on the data below please contact the Central MA Regional Public Health Alliance.

Healthy Eating and Active Living

Diet and body weight are related to health status. Good nutrition is important to the growth and development of children. A healthful diet also helps Americans reduce their risks for many health conditions, including:

• Overweight and Obesity
• Malnutrition
• Heart Disease
• High Blood Pressure
• Type 2 Diabetes
• Some Cancers

Because weight is influenced by energy (calories) consumed and expended, interventions to improve weight can support changes in diet or physical activity. They can help change individuals’ knowledge and skills, reduce exposure to foods low in nutritional value and high in calories, or increase opportunities for physical activity.
Source: Healthy People 2020

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Why this is important:
Individuals who are active the recommended 150 minutes per week are less likely to be overweight or obese and less likely to suffer chronic disease.
Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2011

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Why this is important:
These values are estimates of the percent of adults that have participated in any physical activity during the month prior to the survey. Regular physical activity is recommended to maintain optimal health.
Source: MA Healthy Aging Community Data Profile (Estimated based on BRFSS data), 2007-2011

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Why this is important:
Individuals who eat the recommended 5 or more servings of fruit and vegetables per day are less likely to be overweight or obese and less likely to suffer chronic disease.
Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2011

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Why this is important:
Prevalence of overweight and obesity is used by the Department of Health and Human Services as a Leading Health Indicator, used to quantify the overall health of communities.
Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2011

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Why this is important:
This value is collected annually by public schools and reported to the MA Department of Public Health. Childhood obesity is a risk factor for chronic diseases later in life. This value is used in the Greater Worcester Community Health Improvement Plan as an indicator of success in the area of healthy eating and active living.
Source: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, School Health Unit, “The Status of Childhood Weight in Massachusetts,” 2011

Behavioral Health

Mental Health
According to CDC and Healthy People 2020:

“Mental health is essential to a person’s well-being, healthy family and interpersonal relationships, and the ability to live a full and productive life. People, including children and adolescents, with untreated mental health disorders are at high risk for many unhealthy and unsafe behaviors, including alcohol or drug abuse, violent or self-destructive behavior and suicide – the 11th leading cause of death in the United States for all age groups and the second leading cause of death among people age 25 to 34.

Mental health disorders also have a serious impact on physical health and are associated with the prevalence, progression and outcome of some of today’s most pressing chronic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Mental health disorders can have harmful and long-lasting effects – including high psychosocial and economic costs – not only for people living with the disorder, but also for their families, schools, workplaces and communities.

Fortunately, a number of mental health disorders can be treated effectively, and prevention of mental health disorders is a growing area of research and practice. Early diagnosis and treatment can decrease the disease burden of mental health disorders as well as associated chronic diseases. Assessing and addressing mental health remains important to ensure that all Americans lead longer, healthier lives.”

http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/LHI/mentalHealth.aspx
http://www.cdc.gov/mentalhealth/basics.htm


Why this is important:
The National Prevention Strategy suggests enhancing data collection systems to better identify and address mental and emotional health needs. According to the US Surgeon General’s report, it is estimated that only about 17% of US adults are considered to be in a state of optimal mental health. The CDC reports there is emerging evidence that positive mental health is associated with improved health outcomes.http://www.cdc.gov/mentalhealth/basics.htm
Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2011

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Why this is important:
The National Prevention Strategy suggests healthcare institutions screen for mental health needs among children and adults, especially those with disabilities and chronic conditions. Evidence has shown that mental disorders, especially depressive disorders, are strongly related to the occurrence, successful treatment and course of many chronic diseases including diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, asthma and obesity and many risk behaviors for chronic disease; such as, physical inactivity, smoking, excessive drinking and insufficient sleep.
Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2011

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Why this is important:
The former Surgeon General notes that there are social determinants of mental health as there are social determinants of general health that need to be in place to support mental health. These include adequate housing, safe neighborhoods, equitable jobs and wages, quality education and equity in access to quality healthcare.
Source: Worcester Regional Youth Health Survey 2011, MA YRBS 2011, US YRBS 2011

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Tobacco Use
According to the CDC and the US Department of Health and Human Services:

•An estimated 42.1 million people, or 18.1% of all adults (aged 18 years or older), in the United States smoke cigarettes.
•Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, accounting for more than 480,000 deaths, or one of every five deaths, each year.
•More than 16 million Americans suffer from a disease caused by smoking.
•Smoking and smokeless tobacco use are initiated and established primarily during adolescence. Nearly 9 out of 10 smokers started smoking by age 18, and 99% started by age 26.
http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/adult_data/cig_smoking/index.htm
http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/youth_data/tobacco_use/index.htm

According to the CDC, national, state and local program activities have been shown to reduce and prevent youth tobacco use when implemented in concert with each other. They include the following:
• Counteradvertising mass-media campaigns (i.e., TV and radio commercials, posters and other media messages targeted toward youth to counter protobacco marketing).
• Community programs and school and college policies and interventions coordinated and implemented in conjunction with efforts to create tobacco-free social norms.
• Community interventions that reduce tobacco advertising, promotions and commercial availability of tobacco products.
• Higher costs for tobacco products through increased excise taxes.
• Prohibiting smoking in worksites and public places.

Quitting smoking has immediate as well as long-term benefits for you and your loved ones. Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body, causing many diseases and affecting the health of smokers in general.

For support in quitting, including free quit coaching, a free quit plan, free educational materials and referrals to local resources, call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669).

http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/index.htm
http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/quit_smoking/index.htm
http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/youth_data/tobacco_use/index.htm


Why this is important:
Youth tobacco use is a predictor of lifetime use and increases the risk of chronic diseases such as cancer. This value is used in the Greater Worcester Region Community Health Improvement Plan as an indicator of progress in CHIP objective 2.1.Source: Worcester Regional Youth Health Survey 2011, MA YRBS 2011, US YRBS 2011

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Why this is important:
Smoking increases the risk of heart disease, stroke and cancer. Although great progress has been made in tobacco prevention over the past 50 years, there is room for improvement. Research shows there is no safe level of secondhand smoke exposure.Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2011 (18 years old or older)

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Substance Abuse
Substance abuse has a major impact on individuals, families and communities. The effects of substance abuse are cumulative, significantly contributing to costly social, physical, mental and public health problems.

Moreover, CDC reports, alcohol and other drug use among our nation’s youth remains a major public health problem. Substance use and abuse can increase the risk for injuries, violence, HIV infection and other diseases.

According to CDC, youth who start drinking before age 15 are five times more likely to develop alcohol dependence or abuse later in life than those who begin drinking at or after age 21. Reducing underage drinking will require community-based efforts to monitor the activities of youth and decrease youth access to alcohol.

According to Healthy People 2020, stopping substance abuse before it begins can increase a person’s chances of living a longer, healthier and more productive life. Find out more:
http://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/underage-drinking.htm

http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/alcoholdrug
http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/overview.aspx?topicid=40


Why this is important:
Early use of alcohol has been linked to increased risk for future alcohol dependence, substance abuse and participation in risky sexual behaviors. This value is used in the Greater Worcester Region Community Health Improvement Plan as an indicator of progress in CHIP objective 2.2.Source: Worcester Regional Youth Health Survey 2011, MA YRBS 2011, US YRBS 2011

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Why this is important:
The National Prevention Strategy suggests implementing programs for reducing drug abuse and educating youth about the risks of drug abuse (including prescription misuse). Research shows that education about the proper use of prescription drugs and the potential for addiction reduces abuse among adolescents and young adults. This value is used in the Greater Worcester Region Community Health Improvement Plan as an indicator of progress in CHIP objective 2.3.Source: Worcester Regional Youth Health Survey 2011, MA YRBS 2011, US YRBS 2011

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Why this is important:
Data from SAMHSA’s Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) indicate that in 2010, opioid pain relievers were involved in 425,247 drug-related visits to the Emergency Department (ED), compared with 224,706 visits linked to heroin (SAMHSA, 2012). A review that also used data from DAWN found that the highest number of ED visits for nonmedical use of prescription drugs were due to the opioid prescription drugs oxycodone, hydrocodone and methadone (MMWR, 2010).Prevention and Reduction of Opioid Misuse in Massachusetts
Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
From 1997 to 2007, the rates of opioid-related inpatient hospital discharges increased from 151.3 to 279.3 per 100,000 (MDPH, 2009). In July 2006 through June 2007, there were 18,015 nonfatal opioid-related hospital discharges among Massachusetts residents. Total charges for inpatient hospitalizations associated with opioid dependence, abuse and/or overdose exceeded $239 million from June 2006 through July 2007.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
From 1997 to 2009, the number of opioid-related poisoning deaths increased from 218 to 627 (MDPH, 2012). In 2009, opioid-related overdoses killed more people in the state than motor vehicle-related injuries (627 versus 374 deaths, respectively). This value is used in the Greater Worcester Region Community Health Improvement Plan as an indicator of progress in CHIP objective 2.4.Source: MassCHIP, 2010

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Violence and Injury Prevention

Violence and injuries kill more people ages 1 to 44 in the US than any other cause (1).

Violence and injuries cost more than $406 billion in medical care (2).

Beyond their immediate health consequences, injuries and violence have significant impact on the well-being of Americans by contributing to (3):
•Premature Death
•Disability
•Poor Mental Health
•High Medical Costs
•Lost Productivity

Falls are the leading cause of non-fatal injuries for all children ages 0 to 19. Every day, approximately 8,000 children are treated in US emergency rooms for fall-related injuries. This adds up to almost 2.8 million children each year (4). Some falls are preventable; here are some tips from CDC:
•Play safely. Falls on the playground are a common cause of injury. Check to make sure that the surfaces under playground equipment are safe, soft and well-maintained (such as wood chips or sand, not dirt or grass).
•Make your home safer. Use home safety devices such as guards on windows that are above ground level, stair gates and guard rails. These devices can help keep a busy, active child from taking a dangerous tumble.
•Keep sports safe. Make sure your child wears protective gear during sports and recreation. For example, when inline skating, use wrist guards, knee and elbow pads and a helmet.
•Supervision is key. Supervise young children at all times around fall hazards such as stairs and playground equipment, whether you’re at home or out to play.

Each year, one in every three adults age 65 and older falls. Falls can cause moderate to severe injuries such as hip fractures and head traumas, and can increase the risk of early death. Fortunately, falls are a public health problem that is largely preventable (5). Older adults can stay independent and reduce their chances of falling (6). They can:
•Exercise regularly. It is important that the exercises focus on increasing leg strength and improving balance, and that they get more challenging over time. Tai Chi programs are especially good.
•Ask their doctor or pharmacist to review their medicines – both prescription and over-the-counter – to identify medicines that may cause side effects or interactions such as dizziness or drowsiness.
•Have their eyes checked by an eye doctor at least once a year and update their eyeglasses to maximize their vision. Consider getting a pair with single vision distance lenses for some activities such as walking outside.
•Make their homes safer by reducing tripping hazards, adding grab bars inside and outside the tub or shower and next to the toilet, adding railings on both sides of stairways and improving the lighting in their homes.

For more information on violence and injury prevention, go to:
www.cdc.gov/injury
www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/overview.aspx?topicid=24


Why this is important:
Pediatric falls are prioritizing the community health improvement plan as an area where significant prevention can be accomplished through policy change. Because some pediatric falls represent the most preventable type of fall, it is important to the community to pass policies that would significantly decrease deadly falls in children. Reducing falls in children is an objective of the Greater Worcester Community Health Improvement Plan supporting Domain 4: Violence and Injury Prevention.Source: MA Inpatient Hospital Discharge, Observation Stay and Emergency Department Discharge Databases, Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA)

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Why this is important:
As the senior population grows, falls prevention has become a public health priority and the falls rate is used by the US Department of Health and Human Services as a Leading Health Indicator to reflect communities’ progress in the area of unintentional injury. Reducing falls is an objective of the Greater Worcester Community Health Improvement Plan supporting Domain 4: Violence and Injury Prevention.Source: MA Inpatient Hospital Discharge, Observation Stay and Emergency Department Discharge Databases, Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA)

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Why this is important:
This value represents the number of emergency department visits for assault injuries per 100,000 population. Reducing violence is a priority of the Greater Worcester Community Health Improvement Plan.Source: MA Inpatient Hospital Discharge, Observation Stay and Emergency Department Discharge Databases, Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA)

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Why this is important:
Violent crime rate is a public safety measure as in it is measured by police data. It encompasses fatal, non-fatal and non-hospitalized incidents. Reducing violence is a priority of the Greater Worcester Community Health Improvement Plan.Source: United States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2011. Data for years 2008-2011 used for reporting of rates.

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Why this is important:
This value represents the number of hospital admissions for motor-vehicle-related injuries among motor-vehicle-occupants per 100,000 population. Motor-vehicle-related injury is a leading cause of unintentional injury. Reducing the incidence of motor-vehicle-related injury is an objective of the Greater Worcester Community Health Improvement Plan supporting Domain 4: Violence and Injury Prevention.Source: MA Inpatient Hospital Discharge, Observation Stay and Emergency Department Discharge Databases, Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA).

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Why this is important:
This value represents the number of emergency department visits for motor-vehicle-related injuries among pedestrians per 100,000 population. Pedestrians are 1.5 times more likely than passenger vehicle occupants to be killed in a car crash on each trip (7,8). Reducing the incidence of motor-vehicle-related injury is an objective of the Greater Worcester Community Health Improvement Plan supporting Domain 4: Violence and Injury Prevention.MA Inpatient Hospital Discharge, Observation Stay and Emergency Department Discharge Databases, Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA)

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  1. NCIPC: Web-Based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS)
  2. Finkelstein EA, Corso PS, Miller TR, Associates. Incidence and economic burden of injuries in the United States. New York, NY: Oxford
  3. http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/overview.aspx?topicid=24
  4. http://www.cdc.gov/SafeChild/Falls/index.html
  5. http://www.cdc.gov/HomeandRecreationalSafety/Falls/index.html
  6. http://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreationalsafety/Falls/adultfalls.html
  7. http://www.cdc.gov/Motorvehiclesafety/Pedestrian_safety/index.html
  8. Beck LF, , Dellinger AM, O’Neil ME. Motor vehicle crash injury rates by mode of travel, United States: Using exposure-based methods to quantify differences. American Journal of Epidemiology 2007;166:212–218

Circulatory: Coronary Heart Disease (CHD)

The leading cause of death in the United States is heart disease. Each year heart disease causes approximately 600,000 deaths, or 1 out of every 4.

According to CDC, the most common type of heart disease is called Coronary Heart Disease, which kills about 385,000 people annually.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people of most ethnicities in the United States, including African Americans, Hispanics and whites.

Lowering you blood pressure and cholesterol will reduce your risk of dying of heart disease. Here are some tips to protect your heart:
•Follow your doctor’s instructions and stay on your medications.
•Eat a healthy diet that is low in salt; low in total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol; and rich in fresh fruits and vegetables.
•Take a brisk 10 minute walk, 3 times a day, 5 days a week.
•Don’t smoke. If you smoke, quit as soon as possible.
http://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/facts.htm


Why this is important:
The number of hospitalizations due to Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) in Worcester’s population in 2011 was 21% higher than the statewide rate. CHD is addressed in the Greater Worcester CHIP through increasing healthy eating & active living, reducing tobacco use and increasing access to primary care.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
The number of Worcester residents who died as a result of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) in 2010 was similar to the number of deaths statewide from CHD. According to the Health of Worcester Report, in 2008 Circulatory System Diseases, including CHD, were the leading causes of death in Worcester. According to the CDC, heart disease is also the leading cause of death nationwide.Source: MassCHIP, 2010

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Why this is important:
The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System is the world’s largest ongoing telephone health survey system. The percentage of Worcester residents self-reporting a history of angina or coronary disease is only slightly higher than what people report statewide.Source: BRFSS, 2011

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Cancer (All Types)

Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, exceeded only by heart disease. In 2010, nearly 575,000 people died of cancer, and more than 1.45 million people had a diagnosis of cancer, according to the United States Cancer Statistics: 1999-2010 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report.

In Massachusetts, according to MassCHIP data and reports by Massachusetts Department of Public Health, cancer is now the leading cause of death in Massachusetts. The age adjusted rate of cancer death in Worcester was double that of reported heart disease related deaths. In 2011, Worcester mortality rate due to cancer was 198 per 100,000, while the age-adjusted rate of mortality due to heart disease, the second leading cause of death, was 99 per 100,000.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in Worcester. Smoking is the top cause of lung cancer, quitting smoking and avoiding secondhand smoke will reduce the chances of developing lung cancer.

http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/lung
http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/data/types.htm
http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/docs/dph/research-epi/death-report-10.pdf


Why this is important:
Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States and represents a significant burden on the healthcare system. To reduce the risk of death from cancer it is important to get regular screenings. Consult with your doctor to determine the types and frequencies of screenings you should receive.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
Cancer is a term used for diseases in which abnormal cells divide without control and are able to invade other tissues. Cancer cells can spread to other parts of the body through the blood and lymph systems. Cancer is not just one disease, but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Research shows that screening for cervical and colorectal cancers as recommended helps prevent these diseases by finding precancerous lesions so they can be treated before they become cancerous. Screening for cervical, colorectal and breast cancers also helps find these diseases at an early, often highly treatable stage, which can help to minimize hospitalization rates. http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/prevention.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
Nearly 14 million Americans with a previous cancer diagnosis are living in the United States. People are living longer after a cancer diagnosis because of advances in early detection and treatment. About two out of every three people diagnosed with cancer are expected to live at least five years after diagnosis, but disparities in health care impact survival. Low-income men and women and members of minority groups who have little or no health insurance coverage are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer at later stages, when survival times are shorter.
http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/survivorship/basic_info/index.htm.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
Vaccines also help reduce cancer risk. The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine helps prevent most cervical cancers and some vaginal and vulvar cancers and the hepatitis B vaccine can help reduce liver cancer risk. Making cancer screening, information and referral services available and accessible to all Americans can reduce cancer incidence and deaths. A person’s cancer risk can be reduced in other ways by receiving regular medical care, avoiding tobacco, limiting alcohol use, avoiding excessive exposure to ultraviolet rays from the sun and tanning beds, eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, maintaining a healthy weight and being physically active.
http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/prevention.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Cancer: Breast (Female)
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women. Having regular mammograms can lower the risk of dying from breast cancer. If you are 50 to 74 years old, be sure to have a screening mammogram every two years. If you are 40 to 49 years old, talk to your doctor about when to start and how often to get a screening mammogram.
http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast


Why this is important:
Early detection is key to reducing the risk of death from breast cancer. CDC recommends regular mammograms for all women over 50. Talk to your doctor to plan a screening schedule that works for you.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the US. Early detection is key to reducing the risk of death from breast cancer. CDC recommends regular mammograms for all women over 50. Talk to your doctor to plan a screening schedule that works for you.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the US. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive factors, smoking, lack of exercise, excessive alcohol use, being overweight and genetics.Source: MassCHIP, 2009

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Cancer:Lung
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death and the second most common cancer among both men and women in the United States.

The most important thing you can do to lower your lung cancer risk is to quit smoking and avoid secondhand smoke.

Quit smoking resources:
Tobacco Control Collaborative FAQs
•Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (784-8669)
•Text “QUIT” to 47848 from your Cell Phone
http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/lung

The second leading cause of lung cancer is radon, a naturally occurring gas that comes from rocks and dirt and can get trapped in houses and buildings. Get your home tested for radon.


Why this is important:
Lung cancer is second most common cancer among both men and women in the US. Quitting smoking and avoiding secondhand smoke is the most important thing you can do to lower your risk of lung cancer. Contact the Worcester Division of Public Health for resources to help quit smoking.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
Lung cancer is second most common cancer among both men and women in the US. Screening tests are available that can help doctors identify lung cancer early, when treatments may work better. Talk with your doctor about whether or not you should be screened.Source: MassCHIP, 2010

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Why this is important:
You can reduce your risk of lung cancer by not smoking, avoiding secondhand smoke and getting your home tested for radon. Contact the Worcester Division of Public Health for resources to help quit smoking.Source: MassCHIP, 2009

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Circulatory: Cerebrovascular Disease

Cerebrovascular Disease is the general term for a brain dysfunction caused by an abnormality of the cerebral (brain) blood supply. The most common example is a stroke, which occurs when the blood supply to the brain is blocked or when a blood vessel in the brain ruptures, causing brain tissue to die.

Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and is a major cause of adult disability. About 800,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year. One American dies from a stroke every 4 minutes, on average.

http://www.cdc.gov/stroke/


Why this is important:
A stroke can occur at any time, in anyone. Risk factors for stroke include diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, genetics and age. You can help prevent a stroke by eating a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, not smoking and limiting alcohol.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
Fast treatment is key to reducing the risk of death from a stroke if one occurs. Call 911 immediately if you have any of these symptoms: numbness or weakness especially on one side of the body, confusion, trouble speaking, sudden vision problems dizziness, loss of balance, sudden severe headache.Source: MassCHIP, 2010

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Why this is important:
This value is estimated using data collected by the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Some people can have mini-strokes, known as transient ischemic attacks, which can recur and increase the risk for a major stroke.Source: MassCHIP, 2010

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Respiratory: Asthma

Asthma is a disease that affects the lungs. It is one of the most common long-term diseases of children. Asthma causes repeated episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness and nighttime or early morning coughing. If your child has asthma, he or she has it all the time, but he or she will have asthma attacks only when something bothers his or her lungs. An asthma attack can occur when someone with asthma is exposed to things in the environment, such as house dust mites and tobacco smoke.

Find out more:
http://www.cdc.gov/asthma/impacts_nation/asthmafactsheet.pdf
http://www.cdc.gov/asthma/stateprofiles/Asthma_in_MA.pdf


Why this is important:
Asthma attacks can be life threatening and represent a significant burden to the healthcare system. However, the frequency of incidents can be greatly reduced by following an asthma control plan prepared by your doctor. Worcester DPH is working with community partners to develop programs to help children improve control of their asthma and reduce emergency department visits.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
Triggers for asthma can include mold, tobacco smoke, outdoor air pollution, and infections linked to influenza, colds, and other viruses. Avoiding these triggers, along with using inhaled corticosteroids and other medicines, are the keys to preventing an asthma attack. Visit CDC’s National Asthma Control Program site to learn more about asthma and how you can manage it.
http://www.cdc.gov/asthma/helping_people.htm.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
Asthma attacks can be life threatening and represent a significant burden to the healthcare system. However, the frequency of incidents can be greatly reduced by following an asthma control plan prepared by your doctor. Worcester DPH is working with community partners to develop programs to help children improve control of their asthma and reduce asthma-related hospitalizations.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
Control your asthma and avoid an attack by taking your medicine exactly as your doctor tells you and by staying away from things that can trigger an attack. With your healthcare provider’s help, make your own asthma action plan. Decide who should have a copy of your plan and where he or she should keep it. Take your long-term control medicine even when you don’t have symptoms.
http://www.cdc.gov/asthma/faqs.htm.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
Although extremely rare, death from acute asthma do happen. Fast treatment is important in reducing the risk of death during an acute asthma event. Be sure to keep rescue inhalers easily accessible and use as directed by your doctor. Worcester DPH is working with community partners to develop programs to help children improve control of their asthma prevent asthma-related deaths.Source: MassCHIP, 2010

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Why this is important:
This value is estimated based on the data collected by the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Asthma is extremely common in the US among both children and adults. While the exact cause of asthma is unknown, it has been linked to smoking, obesity, age and ethnicity.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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Why this is important:
This value is estimated based on the data collected by the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Asthma is extremely common in the US among both children and adults. While the exact cause of asthma is unknown, it has been linked to smoking, obesity, age and ethnicity.Source: MassCHIP, 2011

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